This Year’s Washington Adventist University MLK Prayer Breakfast Focused on “Deepening our Faith in Difficult Times”

Honoring the life and accomplishments of Martin Luther King, Jr.

MLKbooks

Takoma Park, MD (January 19, 2015) Washington Adventist University (WAU) this morning held its annual prayer breakfast in honor of Martin Luther King, Jr., Ph.D. The topic was “Deepening our Faith in Difficult Times,” and the event was attended by WAU faculty, staff and students on a day when the university is closed for the national holiday in honor of King.

Welcoming remarks were provided by Patrick Williams, Ph.D., associate provost and dean of WAU’s School of Arts and Social Sciences. The keynote speaker for the morning prayer breakfast was Charles A. Tapp, senior pastor at Sligo Seventh-day Adventist Church, who addressed the theme of “Deepening our Faith in Difficult Times.”  

MLKbreakfast

"For this university, which is proud to be considered a gateway to service, it is especially important to reflect on the accomplishments of a man who lived a life of service to others and changed the world for the better through peaceful means," said Adrienne Matthews, Interim Vice President of Student Life, who organized this year’s prayer breakfast. 

The event also featured Rev. Rawle King of the Congressional Research Service delivering “Reflections on the Past” and Timothy Nelson, director of the WAU Men’s Residence Life, leading a “Test Your Knowledge Of...” feature.  In addition, Evenn Gill, RN, 50+ Association, Metropolitan Seventh-Day Adventist Church, addressed “A Litany of Faith.”  Also included in the event were prayers for peace, justice and faith -- delivered by WAU faculty -- and musical selections performed by Jeffery Wilson, a sophomore biology major, and Wendell Phipps, a senior computer science major.  

Adjunct Professor of African American History Derrick Green provided reflections and delivered the benediction for the event, which was held on campus in the Wilkinson Hall Dining Room, 7600 Flower Ave., Takoma Park, Md. 20912.

MLKprayerbreakfast

#  #  #

Washington Adventist University is Montgomery County's only four-year private college. Part of the Seventh-day Adventist system of higher education, Washington Adventist University has been educating college students since 1904 on a 19-acre campus in suburban Takoma Park, close to the nation’s capital. A total of 1,080 students of all faiths participate in the university’s eight graduate and 32 undergraduate programs. The 2014 edition of U.S. News & World Report ranked Washington Adventist University among the best regional colleges in the north.

 

Media Contacts:
Angie Crews, 301-891-4134, acrews@wau.edu
Donna Bigler, 240-286-1169, dbigler@wau.edu

Washington Adventist University Adult Degree Program Offers Students Inaugural Week of Spiritual Emphasis

WAU’s holistic approach to education nurtures mind, body and soul

Richard Matthews

Takoma Park, MD (January 13, 2015)  Washington Adventist University’s School of Graduate and Professional Studies is hosting its first Week of Spiritual Emphasis January 25-29, offering students the opportunity to take a half-hour break from class each evening to hear a different speaker from the Department of Religion present on the theme of “spiritual distractions.”  The events will be held on campus in Richards Hall Chapel, and class breaks will be adjusted so that students may attend.

“Most of the students in our accelerated evening degree program are busy adults who not only hold full-time jobs, but are also raising families – which doesn’t give them a lot of time for themselves,” said Nicole Currier, dean of the School of Graduate and Professional Studies. “This is an Adventist university that takes a holistic approach to education. That’s why we offer programs like the Week of Spiritual Emphasis, to give our students opportunities to enhance their physical and spiritual health so they can graduate strong.” 

Speakers during the Week of Spiritual Emphasis will include graduate student Richard Matthews, who will speak on Sunday, January 25 from 4:30 -5 p.m. In addition to pursuing his master’s degree in religion, Matthews has been serving God, family, and country for thirty years.  He has a long and distinguished career in military and government.  He is also a son, father, brother, uncle, friend, intelligence officer, graduate student, and considers himself to be a sinner saved by grace. 

Oye Sobo will speak on Monday, January 26, from 7:30 – 8 p.m.  He is an ordained minister and the Pastor at Watchman Ministries in Capitol Heights, Maryland. In addition to his pastoral and ministerial duties, he is a social worker with the Prince George’s County Department of Social Services. He is happily married and blessed with children.

Scheduled to speak on Tuesday, January 27, from 7:30 – 8 p.m. is Tim Soper, a Bible teacher by trade, having taught religion courses and served as an academy chaplain for the past 14 years.  He and his wife, Amy, spent two years serving as missionaries on the South Pacific island of Guam, after which they served God in less-tropical places like Ohio and Maryland.  They have two daughters who have helped Tim understand the love that God has for His own creation. 

Kingston, Jamaica-born Curtis Roberts is scheduled to speak on Wednesday, January 28, from 7:30 – 8 p.m.  Roberts is married to Kerry Roberts and is the father of two boys, Curtis Junior (CJ) who is 3 years old and Connor who is 9 months old.  Curtis holds two bachelor’s degrees, the first is in finance from Florida Atlantic University (FAU) and the second in theology from Washington Adventist University (WAU).  He is completing a Master of Arts degree in Religion, with a concentration in ethical leadership.  He currently serves as an elder at the Re-Creation Seventh-day Adventist Church in Park Heights, Baltimore. 

Novella Smith is currently completing her Master of Arts degree in Religion at WAU, with a concentration in ethical leadership. She will speak on Thursday, January 29, from 7:30 – 8 p.m. Smith is a member of the Metropolitan Seventh-day Adventist Church in Hyattsville, MD, where she serves as an elder, pathfinder drum leader, and the teen ministry leader. 

Washington Adventist University is located on Flower Ave., near the intersection with Carroll Ave. in Takoma Park. The university’s School of Graduate and Professional Studies offers 11 undergraduate degree programs and eight graduate programs, including two fully online. The next session of courses starts the week of March 8-12. For more information, call 301-891-4092 or go to the website at www.wau.edu/academics/school-of-graduate-and-professional-studies.

#  #  #

Washington Adventist University is Montgomery County's only four-year private college. Part of the Seventh-day Adventist system of higher education, Washington Adventist University has been educating college students since 1904 on a 19-acre campus in suburban Takoma Park, close to the nation’s capital. A total of 1,080 students of all faiths participate in the university’s eight graduate and 32 undergraduate programs. The 2014 edition of U.S. News & World Report ranked Washington Adventist University among the best regional colleges in the north.

Media Contacts:
Angie Crews, 301-891-4134, acrews@wau.edu
Donna Bigler, 240-286-1169, dbigler@wau.edu

Washington Adventist University Professor Presents Adventist Demographic Study & Education Survey to Local Adventist Community Action Council

John-Gavin-1

Takoma Park, MD (January 12, 2015)  The results of a study on Seventh-day Adventist (SDA) demographics in the Baltimore-Washington metropolitan area were presented recently at the Adventist Community Action Council’s first meeting of the new year. The group is comprised of leaders of Adventist churches, organizations and community groups who coordinate their efforts and resources to address key community issues. Although the study was completed in 2009, the results were again presented to help new ACAC members better understand Adventist demographics and perspectives as they plan their activities for 2015.
                                                                        
Washington Adventist University Professor John Gavin, who is also the Director of the Center for Metropolitan Ministry, conducted the initial study six years ago, and compared data with previous studies from 1987 and 2004.  The study included a telephone survey in mid-2008 of 379 randomly-selected Adventist families in the Baltimore-Washington metropolitan area.
 
“This information provides a clear profile of Adventists in the Baltimore-Washington Area, along with candid responses from members about Adventist Education that is vital for school leaders and educators who are members of the ACAC,” reports Gavin.

The study indicates that there were more than 22,000 Adventists living in the area in 2009.  The highest concentration of local Adventist members, schools and churches at the time were concentrated in Montgomery and Prince George’s Counties along the Route 29 and Interstate 95 corridors. Other notable clusters were located in the Baltimore area and the Frederick/Hagerstown areas, as well as Southern Prince George’s County.

The 2009 study showed that 60 percent of Adventists were non-Hispanic whites, while 18 percent were African American, 7 percent were Asian or Pacific Islander, 6 percent were Hispanic, and about 9 percent identified as multiracial or an ethnic group other than the choices provided.

In comparing the data with previous studies, the ethnic profile of the local Adventist membership is clearly changing. Between 1987 and 2009, the percentage of parents who are white dropped by half, while all other ethnic groups grew. The Asian and Hispanic segments increased five-fold, which is reflected in the continued growth of immigrant churches. Nearly half of the families reached – 44 percent -- included at least one parent who is an immigrant to the United States.

Some notable results from the survey indicated that Adventist families are primarily middle-class, with 40 percent falling into the $50,000 to $99,000 income range; and 23 percent earning $100,000 or more annually. The Adventist families also tend to be more educated than the general population, with nearly 60 percent holding a college or graduate degree.  

More than a third (36 percent) of Adventists fell into the “before Baby Boom” generation (ages 77-100), and 43 percent fell into the Baby Boomer generation (ages 45-63 at the time of the survey in 2009). Only 12 percent were Generation X (ages 33 to 44 in 2009), and only 4 percent were Millennials (ages 15-32 in 2009).  Only 28 percent of those families surveyed had children at home.

The number of respondents who said they attended church weekly fell from a high of 86 percent in 1987 to 55 percent in 2009.

The study was commissioned by the ACAC and funded by Washington Adventist University, the Potomac, Chesapeake and Allegheny East Conferences, Takoma Academy, and Sligo School.

The Adventist Community Action Council includes representatives from Washington Adventist University, Adventist Community Services of Greater Washington, Sligo Seventh-day Adventist Church, Washington Adventist Hospital and Adventist Healthcare, the Columbia Union Conference of the Seventh-day Adventist Church, the Potomac Conference Adventist Book Store, WGTS Radio, Takoma Academy, Sligo Adventist School, John Nevins Andrews School, George E. Peters School, Takoma Park Seventh-day Adventist Church and the Metropolitan Seventh-day Adventist Church.

The council routinely meets the second Friday of each month at 8:30 a.m. in the Columbia Room of Washington Adventist University’s Wilkinson Hall. For more information about the organization, or to confirm that the location and time haven’t changed for a particular meeting, contact Erwin Mack at eandsmack@aol.com.

For copies of the Adventist demographic study, contact Professor John Gavin at jgavin@wau.edu.

#  #  #

Washington Adventist University is Montgomery County's only four-year private college. Part of the Seventh-day Adventist system of higher education, Washington Adventist University has been educating college students since 1904 on a 19-acre campus in suburban Takoma Park, close to the nation’s capital. A total of 1,080 students of all faiths participate in the university’s eight graduate and 32 undergraduate programs. The 2014 edition of U.S. News & World Report ranked Washington Adventist University among the best regional colleges in the north.

 

Media Contacts:
Angie Crews, 301-891-4134, acrews@wau.edu
Donna Bigler, 240-286-1169, dbigler@wau.edu

Washington Adventist University Mourns Death of Adjunct Professor of Information Systems Johnnie Drake

Jdrake

Takoma Park, MD (January 12, 2015)  Washington Adventist University (WAU) faculty, staff and students this week are mourning the January 9 death of Adjunct Professor Johnnie E. Drake, Ph.D., who taught information systems technology and business strategy courses for the School of Graduate and Professional Studies (SGPS) for more than 15 years.

“Professor Drake has long provided our students with critical skills for the future, and we are very sad to lose his extremely knowledgeable and real-world approach to information systems issues,” said Nicole Currier, dean of the WAU School of Graduate and Professional Studies. “He was an outstanding educator, and his loss is already being felt across this campus.”

Drake began teaching in the university’s School of Graduate and Professional Studies (formerly known as the Adult Evening Program) in 1999. The courses he taught included Introduction to Computer Concepts, Advanced Computer Concepts, System Analysis and Design, Introduction to Programming, IT Project Management, Essential Supervisory Techniques, Health Care Information Systems, Essential Supervisory Techniques, and Business Strategy.

He earned his Ph.D. in organizational management in 2009 at Capella University in Minneapolis, Minnesota, and earned two master’s degrees from Webster University in St. Louis, Missouri – one in computer resource management in 1989, and the other in business management in 1986.  Drake earned his bachelor’s degree in sociology from the University of Wyoming in 1980.

Drake served more than 25 years in the U.S. Air Force, where he rose to the rank of major and oversaw the personnel needs of more than 44,000 active duty members, retirees and their dependents.  Upon his retirement, he served in a variety of computer management roles, including at the Pentagon as chief of on-site operations and instructional systems for KEI Pearson.  He also worked in Arlington, Virginia as a program manager and senior instructional systems designer/lead trainer for Pearson Analytic Solutions; and as a senior analyst and training manager for Analytic Services, Inc.

The funeral for Johnnie Drake will be held at 11 a.m. on Wednesday, January 14 at Lee Funeral Home, 6633 Old Alexandria Ferry Road, Clinton, MD 20735. A viewing will be held that same morning at 10 a.m., immediately prior to the funeral.  Following the funeral service, a repast will be held at Colony South Hotel, 7401 Surratts Road, Clinton MD 20735.              
#  #  #

Washington Adventist University is Montgomery County's only four-year private college. Part of the Seventh-day Adventist system of higher education, Washington Adventist University has been educating college students since 1904 on a 19-acre campus in suburban Takoma Park, close to the nation’s capital. A total of 1,080 students of all faiths participate in the university’s eight graduate and 32 undergraduate programs. The 2014 edition of U.S. News & World Report ranked Washington Adventist University among the best regional colleges in the north.

Media Contacts:
Angie Crews, 301-891-4134, acrews@wau.edu
Donna Bigler, 240-286-1169, dbigler@wau.edu

Washington Adventist University Alumnus Jose Barrientos is Appointed

Youth Ministries Director for the Potomac Conference of the Seventh-day Adventist Church

Jose Barrientos

Takoma Park, MD (December 23, 2014) Washington Adventist University alumnus Jose A. Barrientos Jr. has been appointed Youth Ministries Director for the Potomac Conference of the Seventh-day Adventist Church. He will take on his new duties starting January 1, 2015. He previously served as the children’s pastor at Community Praise Center in Alexandria, Va.

“I thank God and the administration of the Potomac Conference for allowing me to serve the Lord and as the new youth director,” said Barrientos.  “It is with great excitement that I am looking forward to all the blessings that God has in store for all of us.”

Barrientos graduated from Washington Adventist University in 2007 (then known as Columbia Union College), earning a degree in theology with an emphasis in metropolitan ministry and a minor in Biblical languages. He received his master’s degree in business administration from Washington Adventist University in 2011. He is currently studying for his Master of Divinity degree at Andrews University in Berrien Springs, Mi.

Having served in a variety of capacities for the Potomac Conference, Barrientos took part in youth congresses, evangelistic series and youth retreats around the world. He is a gifted speaker with a talent for connecting with all ages and cultures. As youth director for the Potomac Conference, Barrientos will focus on event planning and finding ways for youth to connect within their local churches.

His wife, Claudya, will join him in his new work.  She currently serves as the Potomac Conference Clerk.

#  #  #

Washington Adventist University is Montgomery County's only four-year private college. Part of the Seventh-day Adventist system of higher education, Washington Adventist University has been educating college students since 1904 on a 19-acre campus in suburban Takoma Park, close to the nation’s capital. A total of 1,080 students of all faiths participate in the university’s eight graduate and 32 undergraduate programs. The 2014 edition of U.S. News & World Report ranked Washington Adventist University among the best regional colleges in the north.

Washington Adventist University Participates in Adventist Community Action Council to Address Community Issues

ACACmeetingwithHansRiemer

Takoma Park, MD (December 16, 2014)  During the December meeting of the Adventist Community Action Council (ACAC), Washington Adventist University representatives and other members of the organization participated in a conversation with Montgomery County Councilmember Hans Riemer, an at-large member of the County Council who lives in Takoma Park. He fielded questions about transportation projects that may affect traffic in the area, and expressed interest in the group’s member organizations and activities. In addition, group members at the December meeting reported on food drives that served 800 families over the Thanksgiving holidays and discussed upcoming efforts to serve more families in need.

The ACAC was founded 12 years ago by Erwin Mack with Sligo Pastor Peter Bath and Monte Sahlin as a way to more effectively communicate and coordinate the resources of Adventist organizations in the Takoma Park area and address key community issues.  Mack continues to lead the organization. In addition to Washington Adventist University, the group includes representatives from Adventist Community Services of Greater Washington, Sligo Seventh-day Adventist Church, Washington Adventist Hospital and Adventist Healthcare, the Columbia Union Conference of the Seventh-day Adventist Church, the Potomac Conference Adventist Book Store, WGTS Radio, Takoma Academy, Sligo Adventist School, John Nevins Andrews School, George E. Peters School, Takoma Park Seventh-day Adventist Church and the Metropolitan Seventh-day Adventist Church.

The group routinely meets the second Friday of each month at 8:30 a.m. in the Columbia Room of WAU’s Wilkinson Hall.

For more information about the organization, or to confirm that the location and time haven’t changed for a particular meeting, contact Erwin Mack at eandsmack@aol.com.

#  #  #

Washington Adventist University is Montgomery County's only four-year private college. Part of the Seventh-day Adventist system of higher education, Washington Adventist University has been educating college students since 1904 on a 19-acre campus in suburban Takoma Park, close to the nation’s capital. A total of 1,080 students of all faiths participate in the university’s eight graduate and 32 undergraduate programs. The 2014 edition of U.S. News & World Report ranked Washington Adventist University among the best regional colleges in the north.

 

Media Contacts:
Angie Crews, 301-891-4134, acrews@wau.edu
Donna Bigler, 240-286-1169, dbigler@wau.edu

Washington Adventist University Faculty and Staff Receive Recognition for Professional Accomplishments and Service

Employee Banquet

Takoma Park, MD (December 11, 2014) The Washington Adventist University Board of Trustees sponsored an employee banquet recently for the university’s faculty and staff, recognizing them for their professional accomplishments and service, and expressing appreciation for their demonstrated dedication and commitment to the mission of the university.

During the event, six faculty members were honored for their professional accomplishments, four received peer-nominated and peer-voted awards, 26 others received service awards and four retirees were recognized for their years of service.

The banquet was held at the North Bethesda Marriott Hotel and Conference Center on November 19, and it began with a welcome from Chairman of the WAU Board of Trustees Dave Weigley who also serves as President of the Columbia Union Conference of the Seventh-day Adventist Church, and WAU President Weymouth Spence. 

“It was a wonderful occasion for our WAU Board of Trustees and administrators to express appreciation for the continued excellence we’re seeing at our university through its faculty, staff, and all who have dedicated so many years to our educational ministry,” said WAU Board Chair Weigley. “We’re delighted at how they are carrying on the legacy of preparing students for service by engaging minds and transforming lives.” 

“With so many talented and hard-working faculty and staff here at Washington Adventist University, it’s nice to be able to offer appreciation for all they do,” said President Spence, Ed.D., R.T. “Those who received special awards for their contributions and professional accomplishments are role models for our students and other staff, and they are deserving of all the recognition and encouragement we can offer.”

Faculty members recognized for their professional accomplishments included Melissa Henley, MSW, Department of Social Work; Ralph Johnson, Ph.D., dean of the Betty Howard Center for Student Success; Mikhail Kulakov, D.Phil., Department of Religion; Grant Leitma, Ph.D., chair of the Department of Psychology; Kristin Mitas, program director for the Department of Medical Imaging; and Melinda Villanueva, Ph.D., Department of Biology.

The peer-nominated award recipients included Wanda Colon Canales, director of Admissions for dedication to teamwork; Jean Innocent, Assistant Dean of Men for modelling spiritual leadership; Ellie Barker, Director of Alumni Relations for passion for the work and for WAU; and Becky Barker, First Year Experience coordinator for outstanding service to students.

Service awards were presented to Acquisitions Technician Deborah Szasz and Assistant Registrar Anne Saggurthi for their 35 years at the university; Telecommunications Technician Welton Ingram was recognized for 30 years; Biology Professor Glenn Bennett for 20 years; Associate Dean of Student Success Fitzroy Thomas for 15 years; Assistant Dean of the School of Arts & Sciences John Gavin for 10 years; and recognized for five years of service were WGTS Senior Chaplain and Community Relations Manager Terry Johnsson, Assistant Professor of Music Daniel Lau, Department of Education Program Manager for Professional Development Schools Jamesa Lewis, and Department of Education Office Secretary and Data Manager Dorrett McFarlane.

New employees who completed their first year of service were also recognized. They included SGPS Program Coordinator Carol Cogen, Admissions Counselor Desiree Dixon, Nursing Assistant Professor Sonia Donaldson, Assistant Dean of Men Jean Innocent, Dean of the Betty Howard Center for Student Success Ralph Johnson, Chaplain for Ministries Regina Johnson, Financial Aid Advisor Joel Mercado, SGPS Program Coordinator Jessica Mihos, Junior Systems Administrator Joshua Simbolon, Maintenance Technician David Smith, Nursing Education Clinical Coordinator Windy Spence-Graham, Nursing Assistant Professor Khadene Taffe, Chaplain for Missions Kaniel Williams, Assistant Professor of Health, Wellness &  Physical Education Vashon Williams, WGTS Morning Show Host Jerry Woods and Interim Registrar Lynn Zabaleta.

Retirees who were bid farewell at the banquet and thanked for their many years of service included:  Maintenance Technician Gary Shewell; Vice President for Student Life Jean Warden; Library Director Lee Wisel; and Senior Programmer Roger Wright.

#  #  #
Washington Adventist University is Montgomery County's only four-year private college. Part of the Seventh-day Adventist system of higher education, Washington Adventist University has been educating college students since 1904 on a 19-acre campus in suburban Takoma Park, close to the nation’s capital. A total of 1,080 students of all faiths participate in the university’s eight graduate and 32 undergraduate programs. The 2014 edition of U.S. News & World Report ranked Washington Adventist University among the best regional colleges in the north.

 

Media Contacts:
Angie Crews, 301-891-4134, acrews@wau.edu

Donna Bigler, 240-286-1169, dbigler@wau.edu

Washington Adventist University and REACH Columbia Union Urban Evangelism School Sign Agreement to Jointly Provide Urban Ministry Training

WAU CUC agreement

 

Students May Earn up to 15 Transferable College Credits

Takoma Park, MD (December 11, 2014) The Washington Adventist University (WAU) Department of Religion will soon be offering courses in field evangelism to students interested in urban ministry who are also participating in the REACH Columbia Union Evangelism School (RCUUES) in Philadelphia, Pa. The two schools and the Columbia Union Conference of the Seventh-day Adventist Church signed a memorandum of understanding recently that will guide the joint training effort.

“We are pleased to work with the REACH Columbia Union Urban Evangelism School to help train students who are interested in urban ministry,” said WAU President Weymouth Spence, Ed.D., R.T. “Washington Adventist University has long been a gateway to service, offering encouragement to faculty, students and staff who participate in  mission trips locally and abroad. This agreement offers students yet another opportunity to learn how to better serve others in our North American cities and urban areas.”

“Engaging young adults is a priority for the Seventh-day Adventist Church and the Columbia Union Conference,” said Dave Weigley, president of the Columbia Union Conference. “This partnership will provide a great opportunity for us to help our young people experience the mission of our church firsthand. We’re pleased that one of our own young adults, Dr. Tara VinCross, will serve as director and help prepare young leaders for service.”

As part of the signed agreement, faculty from the WAU Department of Religion will provide leadership training in discipleship, community development, urban agriculture and various aspects of evangelism. The joint effort will provide students with the opportunity to gain a unique experience in metropolitan/urban ministry through a selection of courses that will enrich their experience in urban ministry. The REACH Urban Evangelism School’s hands-on curriculum is offered as a 12-month training and experiential program that prepares students for ministry in cities and urban areas throughout North America.

Students interested in urban ministry and participating in the Urban Evangelism School program will be able to earn up to 15 credits that will be transferrable to any college, and can be counted toward a degree. The WAU courses that will be offered include such topics as Jesus and the Gospels; Ellen G. White and the Gift of Prophecy; Knowing and Sharing Christ; Ministry in the City; The Theory and Practice of Urban Ministry; and Church Growth in the Urban Setting.

As part of the memorandum of understanding, students in the evangelism school program who take the WAU-provided courses will be required to maintain at least a 2.8 grade point average and must be recommended for the courses by their instructors and the advisory committee of REACH Columbia Union, based on classroom and field evaluation. 
 
The REACH Columbia Union Urban Evangelism School is required under the agreement to maintain a high standard of student personal integrity and academic rigor throughout the experiential learning process. The agreement also requires the evangelism school to offer its Urban Mission Year experience to WAU Theology students and those with other majors. As part of the agreement, the Urban Evangelism School will provide appropriate housing for participating WAU students at a location that is close to the school’s Ministry Center in Philadelphia.

For more information about REACH Columbia Union Urban Evangelism School, go to http://reachcolumbiaunion.squarespace.com.  For more information about Washington Adventist University, go to http://www.wau.edu 

#  #  #

Washington Adventist University is Montgomery County's only four-year private college. Part of the Seventh-day Adventist system of higher education, Washington Adventist University has been educating college students since 1904 on a 19-acre campus in suburban Takoma Park, close to the nation’s capital. A total of 1,080 students of all faiths participate in the university’s eight graduate and 32 undergraduate programs. The 2014 edition of U.S. News & World Report ranked Washington Adventist University among the best regional colleges in the north.

Media Contacts:
Angie Crews, 301-891-4134, acrews@wau.edu

Donna Bigler, 240-286-1169, dbigler@wau.edu

Washington Adventist University’s Faculty, Staff and Students Mourn the Death of Adjunct Professor of Public Policy Dick Wolfe

large

Takoma Park, MD (November 25, 2014) Washington Adventist University (WAU) is mourning the sudden death this week of adjunct professor of public administration and health care administration Richard Wolfe, who taught both undergraduate and graduate level courses at the university for nearly two decades.

Earlier this semester, Wolfe was a key participant in the Dialogue on Ferguson, Mo. that WAU held in conjunction with Saint Louis University to discuss ways for the community to move forward after the shooting of unarmed teenager Michael Brown.  Wolfe was also an expert on the topic of protected health information. As co-founder of the Public Health Information (PHI) Protection Network, he was organizing a PHI conference for February 2015 in Anaheim, Ca. at the time of his death.

"Dick Wolfe was an energetic and committed educator who inspired students, faculty and staff alike,” said WAU President Weymouth Spence, Ed.D., R.T.  “He brought his real-world experience into the classroom, and challenged students to find ways to effectively apply their knowledge to current issues and events. He was an outstanding individual, and his loss will be profoundly felt on this campus.”

“Because he knew a lot about so many things and was wise in so many ways, Dick Wolfe was a good conversationalist and fun to be around,” said Nicole Currier, dean of the WAU School of Graduate and Professional Studies. “He was the kind of person who was always there for others, and his consistent and valued presence will be missed.”

Since September 1996, Wolfe has taught courses in the WAU School of Graduate and Professional Studies, including undergraduate organizational management classes, as well as graduate courses in public administration, business administration and health care administration.  He was also an associate with Booz Allen Hamilton from June 2006 to November 2011, and was a retired Captain from the U.S. Navy Medical Service Corps, where he served from June 1983 to August 2004.

At Washington Adventist University, Wolfe routinely demonstrated his commitment to improving opportunities for students and teachers, and he had recently been tapped to advise on the creation of new courses that will become part of the university’s growing master’s program in public administration. As a result, Wolfe’s legacy at Washington Adventist University will continue well into the future.

 #  #  #

Washington Adventist University is Montgomery County's only four-year private college. Part of the Seventh-day Adventist system of higher education, Washington Adventist University has been educating college students since 1904 on a 19-acre campus in suburban Takoma Park, close to the nation’s capital. A total of 1,080 students of all faiths participate in the university’s eight graduate and 32 undergraduate programs. The 2014 edition of U.S. News & World Report ranked Washington Adventist University among the best regional colleges in the north.

 

Media Contacts:
Angie Crews, 301-891-4134, acrews@wau.edu
Donna Bigler, 240-286-1169, dbigler@wau.edu